Loading
 

The E2e Project and the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Announce Funding for Energy Efficiency Research Projects

 

Berkeley, CA (December 6, 2016) – In partnership with the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, The E2e Project is pleased to announce four research proposals that have been selected to receive funding for innovative economic research on critical and novel energy efficiency issues. 

With the goal of building a robust body of knowledge about how energy efficiency investments perform in the real world, the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation is allocating over $1 million to fund these four promising and policy-relevant research projects.

The selected projects are:


UNDERSTANDING THE ENERGY EFFICIENCY INVESTMENT GAP

Erica Myers, Peter Christensen, and Paul Francisco (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)

This study will systematically evaluate the relationship between projected and realized savings for low-income households in the Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP) covering a more comprehensive time period than has been possible in the past. The study also includes two RCTs to test (1) the effectiveness of announcing random audits of the contractors’ work, and (2) the impact of bonus payments for contractors who achieve energy savings.


THE IMPACT OF ENERGY EFFICIENCY ON HOUSING PRICES

Sharon Shewmake, Reid Dorsey-Palmateer and Philip B. Thompson (Western Washington University)

Many home energy efficiency attributes are not reflected in real estate prices, and researchers and practitioners have identified the possible benefits of simple adjustments that could address this when homes are listed to be sold. This project will quantify the impact of energy efficiency on housing prices in the U.S. by directly measuring the energy efficiency of homes as the home goes on the market. The researchers will also run an RCT on the impact of realtor incentives to increase the visibility and salience of a home’s energy score.

 

INDUSTRIAL ENERGY EFFICIENCY: THE ROLE OF MANAGEMENT PRACTICES AND PUBLIC POLICY

E. Mark Curtis (Wake Forest University), Gale A. Boyd (Duke University), and Jonathan M. Lee (East Carolina University)

This project seeks to better understand the determinants of energy efficiency in the industrial sector, a traditionally understudied sector within energy efficiency research. Using Census data on manufacturing plants, the project will examine how several factors, including the adoption of modern management practices, impact a plant’s energy efficiency.

 

WHEN DO HOUSEHOLDS PARTICIPATE IN ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAMS?

Kevin Novan and Aaron Smith (University of California – Davis)

This project is motivated by the observation that residential customers are disproportionately likely to invest in energy efficiency soon after they have moved. In collaboration with the Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD), the team will run an RCT to evaluate the effectiveness of sending targeted information on energy audits and rebates to households who have recently opened a new account, suggesting they have moved. This proposal could provide practical insights to program implementers around the country.